Avoiding Reinfection

 
How can I avoid getting a reinfection of genital warts?
 
Chemical and surgical methods destroy visible warts, but the virus may remain in nearby tissue
that seems normal. These treatments can be effective over time. If the virus becomes active again,
the warts may appear weeks or even months/years after therapy. They can also spread to other
areas, i.e., from the penis to the rectal area. Monitoring is recommended to prevent a minor
re-occurrence from spreading.
 
Inspect your external genitals, anus and perineum (the area between) regularly. You may
need a light and a hand-held mirror to get a good view of the area. Be sue to note any warts,
blisters, moles, bumps, and ulcers. Also, look for changes in skin color, such as pink, red or
white patches.
 
Limit your sexual partners. Choose a relationship in which you and your partner restrict
your sexual contact to each other.
 
Have a doctor examine you and your sexual partner whenever signs or symptoms of genital
warts appear.
 
While you are being treated, keep your appointments and receive all the medication needed
to treat the genital warts.
 
Either abstain from sex or use a condom while you are being treated. Condoms are effective in helping to prevent sexually transmitted diseases when used properly.
 
Some experts say that you should consider yourself contagious for 4-6 months following the
removal or treatment of the last lesion.
 
It may be possible that you are over this infection if no other lesions appear in the 4-6
month period as well. 
 
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Dr. Abbadessa is board certified by the AOA and is a member of the Missouri Association Osteopathic Physicians and Surgeons | St. Louis Metropolitan Medical Society | Missouri State Medical Association

 

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